chixoydamrevisited
chixoydamrevisited:



Yesterday afternoon after gathering herbs for my mother near the river I  meandered down the dirt path back to my village.  Nestled among a large patch of wild herbs and flowers, a blue and red skirt moved with the wind seemingly unattached to the bent over woman inspecting the plants.  Suddenly the woman whipped herself upright victoriously holding a red hibiscus flower unaware of my presence.



 A giggle escaped my lips.  With another gust of wind a strand of her hair danced and she turned towards me.  There was no mistake that was Alma the village healer.  She turned and beckoned me to come over as if she had known I was there all along.  With the sun gently caressing our bodies we began walking towards the village.  I always wondered why she blessed all the travelers from other countries that periodically came to our village seeking to consume our culture.  My question escaped my lips before I could stop myself.  Grinning she set her gaze upon the setting sun “Mi hija, we are all children of the earth mother”.  Mid-stride she abruptly stopped, took my hands in hers, and stared into my eyes.  Her eyes pierced through me or maybe they saw everything about me.  “Los abuelos protect you” she whispered.  “Don’t they protect us all?” I asked a little startled.  “Not the way they protect you, you are special mi hija.  Come to the blessing ceremony tomorrow and you will see”.  With that she slowly let go of my hands and began to walk again.  Without missing a step she waved her hand for me to follow.  Dazed I clutched my satchel of herbs and sprinted to catch up.  The next day the travelers came, snapping pictures of our farmland and our houses like they usually do.  They eventually calmed down and gathered around Alma.  She began the ritual, spreading the flowers and praying in both Spanish and Achi.  Warm hands on my shoulders made me jump.  I turned to scold whoever touched me but nobody was there. "The abuelos watch over me" I whispered to myself taking a deep breath. Picture Source


Read more about the TIEChixoy Project, done by the Tufts Institute of the Environment.

chixoydamrevisited:

Yesterday afternoon after gathering herbs for my mother near the river I  meandered down the dirt path back to my village.  Nestled among a large patch of wild herbs and flowers, a blue and red skirt moved with the wind seemingly unattached to the bent over woman inspecting the plants.  Suddenly the woman whipped herself upright victoriously holding a red hibiscus flower unaware of my presence.


A giggle escaped my lips.  With another gust of wind a strand of her hair danced and she turned towards me.  There was no mistake that was Alma the village healer.  She turned and beckoned me to come over as if she had known I was there all along.

With the sun gently caressing our bodies we began walking towards the village.  I always wondered why she blessed all the travelers from other countries that periodically came to our village seeking to consume our culture.  My question escaped my lips before I could stop myself.  Grinning she set her gaze upon the setting sun “Mi hija, we are all children of the earth mother”.  Mid-stride she abruptly stopped, took my hands in hers, and stared into my eyes.  Her eyes pierced through me or maybe they saw everything about me.

“Los abuelos protect you” she whispered.  “Don’t they protect us all?” I asked a little startled.  “Not the way they protect you, you are special mi hija.  Come to the blessing ceremony tomorrow and you will see”.  With that she slowly let go of my hands and began to walk again.  Without missing a step she waved her hand for me to follow.  Dazed I clutched my satchel of herbs and sprinted to catch up.

The next day the travelers came, snapping pictures of our farmland and our houses like they usually do.  They eventually calmed down and gathered around Alma.  She began the ritual, spreading the flowers and praying in both Spanish and Achi.  Warm hands on my shoulders made me jump.  I turned to scold whoever touched me but nobody was there.

"The abuelos watch over me" I whispered to myself taking a deep breath.

Picture Source

Read more about the TIEChixoy Project, done by the Tufts Institute of the Environment.

mothernaturenetwork

mothernaturenetwork:

New life emerges from an unexpected vessel
Once used to break up Palestinian protests, these tear gas canisters have found new purpose as vessels for life. This grenade garden in the West Bank village of Bil’in serves as a memorial for a protester who was killed by a tear gas grenade in 2009. The powerful imagery evokes hope in the face of challenge and reminds us all to appreciate the beauty of life.

chixoydamrevisited
chixoydamrevisited:

From an early age I was taught to respect and to honor mis abuelos or my ancestors and the traditions they passed down to us.With an unwavering patience and an endless supply of love my mother taught me how to dye yarn the way our people have for many generations.Our traditions structured our lives in Rio Negro.  What to eat and how to cook it, how and when to commune with the earth, where and how to make medicine from local plants - everything connected us to our ancestors and to the earth.When I first learned to dye yarn, I felt the presence of my ancestors.  Dying yarn that day was more than a step in making clothing, it connected me to my people’s history.Picture source

Maria’s story happens amidst the Chixoy Dam construction in Guatemala. Created by the Tufts Institute of the Environment, follow this storytelling project here.

chixoydamrevisited:

From an early age I was taught to respect and to honor mis abuelos or my ancestors and the traditions they passed down to us.

With an unwavering patience and an endless supply of love my mother taught me how to dye yarn the way our people have for many generations.

Our traditions structured our lives in Rio Negro.  What to eat and how to cook it, how and when to commune with the earth, where and how to make medicine from local plants - everything connected us to our ancestors and to the earth.

When I first learned to dye yarn, I felt the presence of my ancestors.  Dying yarn that day was more than a step in making clothing, it connected me to my people’s history.

Picture source

Maria’s story happens amidst the Chixoy Dam construction in Guatemala. Created by the Tufts Institute of the Environment, follow this storytelling project here.

unconsumption
unconsumption:


Three British companies have developed a 90% recyclable and reusable circuit board, whose components can be easily separated by soaking in hot water. Funded by the UK government’s Technology Strategy Board with a view to help industry conform to European electronic waste regulation, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), In2Tec and Gwent Electronic Materials have devised an adhesive that helps manufacturers take apart electronic circuit boards and reuse their components to make new components. They call it ReUse – Reusable, Unzippable, Sustainable Electronics.
…
The result was a new adhesive and ink system, which allows the team to put components onto a thermoplastic substrate with a conductive adhesive and make a circuit. A substrate is a solid onto which another solid is applied and that solid adheres to the first. A thermoplastic is something quite pliable at high temperatures but cools down to a rigid solid. The thermoplastic substrate produced by the team can be recycled.

. (via New adhesive system makes a circuit board that is 90% recyclable | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional)

unconsumption:

Three British companies have developed a 90% recyclable and reusable circuit board, whose components can be easily separated by soaking in hot water. Funded by the UK government’s Technology Strategy Board with a view to help industry conform to European electronic waste regulation, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), In2Tec and Gwent Electronic Materials have devised an adhesive that helps manufacturers take apart electronic circuit boards and reuse their components to make new components. They call it ReUse – Reusable, Unzippable, Sustainable Electronics.

The result was a new adhesive and ink system, which allows the team to put components onto a thermoplastic substrate with a conductive adhesive and make a circuit. A substrate is a solid onto which another solid is applied and that solid adheres to the first. A thermoplastic is something quite pliable at high temperatures but cools down to a rigid solid. The thermoplastic substrate produced by the team can be recycled.

. (via New adhesive system makes a circuit board that is 90% recyclable | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional)

chixoydamrevisited
chixoydamrevisited:


I was born in a village in the Guatemalan highlands, near Rio Negro - now known as Chixoy River - on September 15th, 1958.  My birthday falls on the Guatemalan Independence Day when Guatemala gained independence from Spain in 1821.   Generations upon generations of my family lived in this rural area practicing our Mayan traditions.Peaceful days filled my childhood.  Our connection to the land, to nature was above all else valued and honored.  Picture Source


A project by the Tufts Institute of the Environment. The story continues here

chixoydamrevisited:

I was born in a village in the Guatemalan highlands, near Rio Negro - now known as Chixoy River - on September 15th, 1958.  My birthday falls on the Guatemalan Independence Day when Guatemala gained independence from Spain in 1821. 

Generations upon generations of my family lived in this rural area practicing our Mayan traditions.

Peaceful days filled my childhood.  Our connection to the land, to nature was above all else valued and honored. 


Picture Source

A project by the Tufts Institute of the Environment. The story continues here

aboriginalnewswire
May 4, 2014 updates Guatemala: found guilty of genocide on May 10, 2013, the former dictator Efraín Ríos Montt was sentenced to 80 years in prison. By May 20th the verdict was overturned under pressure from President Molina (“Major Tito”) implicated in the genocide and as suggested by The New York Times, the country’s business elite. A re-trial was scheduled for 2014, subsequently delayed until 2015.. The country’s Attorney General who pursued the case and the court’s judge who tried the case became revenge targets of Ríos Montt supporters. Attorney General Claudia Paz y Paz was forced from office early by a technicality as decided by the high court. And most recently, a Guatemalan legal body (errors of judicial behavior are traditionally addressed by other means) ruled Judge Yassmin Barrios forfeit judicial duties for a year and pay a fine for her judicial conduct. The case was brought by a Ríos Montt lawyer. The spurious decision reveals a matrix of corruption that allowed the society to plunge into genocide. The United Nations, international human rights NGO’s and organizations of lawyers have shown a disgusting lack of hard support for Guatemala’s opponents of genocide, and by mocking the Convention with hypocrisy become complicit in the effects of its absence. For more background on trial: “Guatemala: a brave judiciary;” “Masks of Investment: a Trial in Guatemala;”; “Good vs. Evil in Guatemala.” Partial sources online: “A year after genocide trial, has justice been done?” Romina Ruiz-Goiriena, May 3, 2014, CNN World; “Guatemalan Judge Faces Retaliation over Role in Genocide Trial,” Emi MacLean, April 7, 2014, Open Society Justice Initiative; “Guatemala - Interview with Judge Yassmín Barrios: ‘The Door to Impunity and Corruption is Being Opened,’” Óscar F. Herrera, Trans. NISGUA, April 9, 2014, Upside Down World.